x
schencka
reply, re meat, abortion, logic and values
I once worked in a "factory farm." It was a violent place, stenchful, horrible air quality, unhappy hogs. I would cover my eyes from the dust with goggles, my lungs with a breathing mask, and my ears with a loud MP3 player with my favored music, preferably with loud electric guitars. I dealt with my sentiments by repeating in my head, "We must harden our hearts." (I wrote about this in a five-page paper; tell me if I should post it here.)

And I loved it. It was the most intense job: a harmful environment, constant relative danger, needles, power washers that could take off one's skin. The job demanded strength and fortitude, a capacity for violence. I would sometimes think of Nietzsche's definition of "civilization" as "the spiritualization of cruelty." There's truth in that statement.

Pigs are smarter than dogs. They suffer more because they're smarter. They just haven't developed an evolutionary skill canines have: the ability to interpret human behavior. But I eat pork.

I used to believe some new-age-y things; I didn't eat meat for seven months one time, then I ate chicken. And while I worked with the hogs, I felt guilty about it after going to a Buddhist temple. Happily did I get over that (the feeling guilty part, that is).

In the same way that I believe we must harden our hearts to the suffering of cows, hogs, chicken, turkey, tuna, and so on, we must also desensitize ourselves to the suffering of the fetus. Many ain't gonna make it in the first place--animals and fetuses. And domestic animals are only existent because of human agriculture.

The world is a bitter reality, demanding stark, as it were, gray lines. Human beings get to choose whether to eat meat or not and whether or not to terminate their pregnancies. Nothing's natural and everything is natural, too. It's called the natural fallacy; it's an inherently weak argument to use what's "natural" as a crux. If we really thought about it, everything that is possible, even things unimagined and/or unimaginable, are natural.

As for hypocrisy and flawed logic: I give crazy ideas as much leeway as I think myself deserving of. Prolifers support death penalty. I am against the death penalty, for woman's choice. It's a matter of values, and not logic.

Nietzsche called for revaluation and decried "pity" as a scourge. All these ideas factor into the debate causticveracity has introduced. --adam
 
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