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Massive survey shows Americans turning away from organized religion
Tags: religion

CiUMEaPc:UiD3aPc:_Yyc:aULPQL7PQLanchO7DiUr">Link.

Thank the Lord!

It's important to note that the larger the study, the more accurate the results. Many Democrats feared that white Americans would not be willing to vote for Barack Obama, but the polling data held fast.
The report from the Program on Public Values at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., being released today, surveyed 54,461 adults in English or Spanish from February through November of last year. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 0.5 percentage points.
Is Jesus saving us from His followers?
Christians are a declining segment of the country. In 2008, about 76 percent of U.S. adults were Christians, compared with about 77 percent in 2001 and about 86 percent in 1990.
That's a dramatic drop. I believe it shows changing attitudes among the highly educated and young people. As for the "middle class squeeze," consider Starbucks' corporate statement of purpose: "the third place" -- i.e. where you hang out when you're not at home or at work. Church is actually a luxury (in terms of time consumption) that many are forgoing. Religious services are no longer the go-to "third place" for Americans. This is a sign of weakening ideological loyalties.

Fifteen percent of respondents said they had no religion, an increase from 14.2 percent in 2001 and 8.2 percent in 1990.

Now that's dramatic. I would consider myself in this demographic. Let me simply say that religious tradition offers me no succor.

About 12 percent of Americans believe in a higher power but not the personal God at the core of monotheistic faiths. Since 1990, a slightly greater share of respondents -- 1.2 percent -- said they were part of new religious movements, including Scientology, Wicca and Santeria.

Satanism never felt so good! We're winning. (Sarcastic comment directed to Mindsay's resident scholars of fundamentalist Christianity.)

Traditional organized religion is playing less of a role in many lives. Thirty percent of married couples did not have a religious wedding ceremony, and 27 percent of respondents said they did not want a religious funeral.

I remember growing up being told that "unless you get baptized, you can't go to heaven." The more people that do away with this nonsense the better.


One analytical point: considering that more Americans worked more and more hours (until the recession), it's important to note that these figures show the same result as European countries, which have slowly been losing organized religion, but in the US, the weakening of the religious sphere comes from having less free time instead of more (as in Western Europe). And surely the rapid demographic changes must be playing a part, with the US on track to be a minority-majority country in a few decades. Another aspect is the global economy in which the less fortunate are losing education or staying the same while a select percentage have access to upper-level degrees.


If anything, it's amazing the amount of people turning away from organized religion isn't higher. Surely the numbers would indicate that trend if we had a fairer society, with more equality in education and wealth.

 
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